6 Strategies for Negotiating Sponsored Content Contracts

If you’ve ever had a paid partnership with a brand, you know that contracts come with the territory. And if you haven’t done any sponsored content yet, now is the time to brush up on your negotiating skills and contract terminology. 

We’ve reviewed the MAGIC Framework for negotiating with brands in the past, but we wanted to dive deeper into the most common areas for negotiation within contracts.

I know, I know, I can almost hear the snores through the computer screen. But learning the language of contracts can empower you to be a much stronger negotiator and can mean a difference of thousands of dollars in payment.

We’ve broken down six clauses of a sponsored content contract that often lead to negotiations between a brand and a content creator. Within each section, we’ll chat about the most important things to look out for and prioritize. Let’s dig in!

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The ‘MAGIC’ Framework for Negotiating with Brands

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Working with brands on sponsored content is one of the most popular ways that food bloggers, influencers, and content creators can monetize their online businesses.

That said, when it comes time to negotiate your rate and your work with a brand, it can get a little intimidating and complicated.

But knowing what to expect by doing some work ahead of time can help you feel more comfortable and confident when you get to the negotiations.

Allow us to introduce to you the concept of MAGIC, a framework created by our Legal Expert, Danielle Liss from Businessese, in our Negotiating with Brands Quick Win lesson available to all Food Blogger Pro Members.

This framework will help you approach negotiating with brands as a collaboration-based exercise, versus one rooted in conflict. It’ll help you identify and articulate what both sides want in a sponsored partnership so that both you and the brand are happy with the contracted work.

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How We Made Our First $100 from Food Blogging

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We have a bit of a different blog post for you today! And it’s all about how we made our very first $100 from food blogging.

Who is this “we,” you ask? The Food Blogger Pro community and the team here behind Food Blogger Pro and our sister companies.

We say it a lot, but every food blogging journey is different, and it’s really hard to compare one blogger’s story to another.

We all have different responsibilities in addition to trying to grow our food blogs. Some of us have full-time jobs. Others have kids or pets or other family obligations. We live in different countries where we rent or own our own houses. Some bloggers work on their blogs on the weekends, while others can spend a bit more time producing content.

That’s why it’s impossible to compare the growth of one blog to another; there is so much happening behind-the-scenes that impacts the way and the speed at which a blog grows.

So why are we talking about how we’ve made our first $100 today? To show you just some of the ways that bloggers have made it work.

Your first $100 is a huge milestone, and there are so many different ways you can achieve it. Here are just a few ideas:

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3 Strategies to Increase Your Revenue as a Food Blogger

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Hi there, folks! Bjork here. 👋 

I’m hopping on the Food Blogger Pro blog to share some thoughts around a few updates we made recently over on Pinch of Yum that have helped increase earnings.

As you know, our mission at Food Blogger Pro is to help you get a tiny bit better, every day, forever. My hope is that this blog post does exactly that.

But first, a concept I’d like to share:

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Most Popular Ad Networks for Food Bloggers (2021)

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As a food blogger, ads can be a great way to diversify your blogging income. Your site will earn revenue simply when readers visit a page on your site that has an ad — hello, passive income! 👋

However, you don’t necessarily want to be the person working directly with advertisers to get ads enabled on your site, and that’s where ad networks come in. Ad networks make it incredibly simple for website owners to add, track, monitor, and tweak website ads.

In this post, we’re going to dive deep into the wonderful world of ads, as well as some of the most popular ad networks for food bloggers. Let’s get into it!

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Expert Enough: You Don’t Need to be the Ultimate Expert in Order to Create an eBook

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We have a short & sweet concept to share with you today.

And while the post is going to be short, the concept has the potential to have a long-term impact on the revenue that you create from your blog. My hope is that, after reading this short post, you’ll feel empowered to take action and create (and sell) your own eBook. 😊

The concept I’d like to share with you is called, Expert Enough.

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The definitive list of ways to create an income from your food blog

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Many food bloggers would like to “go pro” and turn their blog into a business that can generate a full-time income. It’s possible, but it takes a lot of hard work, dedication, luck, and diversification. That last one, diversification, is a concept that people don’t often think about when they consider creating a full-time income from their blog.

People often use the phrase “don’t put all your eggs in one basket” when referring to diversification, but that phrase doesn’t really work for what I’m trying to communicate in this post. I like this phrase better:

Fill your empty egg carton.

People often use the phrase “don’t put all your eggs in one basket” when referring to diversification, but that phrase doesn’t really work for what I’m trying to communicate in this post. I like this phrase better:

Fill your empty egg carton.

Okay, I’ll be the first to admit that it’s not as catchy, but the visual of the egg carton helps to communicate the point that I’m hoping to make, which is this:

If you have a blog, chances are that your egg carton is pretty close to empty. In other words, there are income streams (openings in the egg carton) that are not being filled (with eggs).

It’s really hard to create a full-income from just one income source (i.e. one egg), but when you fill all of the possible income sources (i.e. openings in the egg carton), it becomes much easier to create a full-time income from your blog.

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A Sweet Pea Chef: A Food Blogger Pro Case Study

We recently received an email from long-time FBP members Dustin and Lacey Baier with a PDF blog post draft that Dustin wanted to share with us. In the email, he said,

"I was starting to write a post for A Sweet Pea Chef that was based off Food Blogger Pro – kind of a success story post. In part, because of the recent success we have seen and, in part, to be a good affiliate piece for Food Blogger Pro. Then I realized that, if I was in your shoes, I might want to use something like this as a case study on Food Blogger Pro or Pinch Of Yum."

Welp, we were definitely interested. We love to think that we help people here at Food Blogger Pro, but there’s nothing like hearing from bloggers who have found success through hard work, determination, and a tiny bit of help from FBP.

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Why You Need to Make a Media Kit Today

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A huge reason many bloggers join Food Blogger Pro is because they want to learn how to make money with their blog. It’s an honorable goal!

A lot of the time, bloggers will hear about advertising networks and the money they can make with them, so they’ll apply and get accepted and stop there. While ad networks might be the main source of income for bloggers with a lot of traffic, the income from running ads on your site can be less than satisfactory if you’re getting just a few thousand page views per month.

Alternatively, working directly with brands can be a reliable source of income if you are able to start and maintain a sponsorship.

But that’s just the thing… How in the world are you supposed to start a sponsorship?!

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The Food Blogger Pro Affiliate Program and Welcome Jasmine

From a business perspective, one of the things that Lindsay and I have really come to believe in is the power of passive income.

Passive income, specifically passive income through affiliate marketing, has really helped us take our monetization game to the next level. For example, with Pinch of Yum, when we recommend products that we love and link to those products as an affiliate, we are able to earn passive income from the referral sales.

This monetization strategy is different than advertising and sponsorships, which can fluctuate from quarter to quarter, month to month, and even week to week. The passive income we earn as affiliates for our favorite products and services can be more consistent and predictable.

One of the things we love about Food Blogger Pro is the fact that we’re able to offer the benefits of passive income to our members through the FBP affiliate program (more on that in a bit!), but we noticed that oftentimes affiliates would sign up for the program and not really know the most effective way to promote FBP to their readers.

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